Wolf Predation on Beavers and Moose in Voyageurs National Park

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Funding Opportunity ID: 296151
Opportunity Number: NOIP17AC01116
Opportunity Title: Wolf Predation on Beavers and Moose in Voyageurs National Park
Opportunity Category: Other
Opportunity Category Explanation: OTHER – This announcement is to provide public notice of the National Park Service’s intention to award a task agreement under a previously competed or single source justified master cooperative agreement.
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Other (see text field entitled “Explanation of Other Category of Funding Activity” for clarification)
Category Explanation: This announcement is to provide public notice of the National Park Service’s intention to award a task agreement under a previously competed or single source justified master cooperative agreement.
CFDA Number(s): 15.945
Eligible Applicants: Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: Eligible applications are members of Coordination Ecosystems Study Units
Agency Code: DOI-NPS
Agency Name: Department of the Interior
National Park Service
Posted Date: Aug 04, 2017
Close Date: Aug 18, 2017
Last Updated Date: Aug 04, 2017
Award Ceiling: $110,000
Award Floor: $26,250
Estimated Total Program Funding: $26,250
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Description: The project would examine gray wolf hunting behavior in an area with abundant beavers to better understand how the availability of vulnerable beaver prey may affect wolf predation on moose and deer. Gray wolves are widely known to prey on adults and fawns/calves of deer and moose. Beavers also make up a large portion of the diet in areas where beavers are plentiful. Recent studies in Voyageurs National Park (VNP) and surrounding area, where beaver densities are very high, demonstrated that up to 38% of the summer diet is beavers. In other areas of the state beavers are much less a part of wolf diet, generally <5-15%. Moose persist in VNP at low numbers, despite a healthy gray wolf population. Does the high abundance of beavers, a more easily killed prey item than moose, result in lower predation on moose? Likewise, how does the availability of beaver prey affect wolf predation on adult and fawn deer in summer and fall?
Version: Synopsis 1





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