NOTICE OF INTENT: Assess the Recovery of Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Arctic Grayling in Restoration Areas

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Funding Opportunity ID: 293244
Opportunity Number: P17AS00194
Opportunity Title: NOTICE OF INTENT: Assess the Recovery of Westslope Cutthroat Trout and Arctic Grayling in Restoration Areas
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Cooperative Agreement
Category of Funding Activity: Natural Resources
Category Explanation:
CFDA Number(s): 15.945
Eligible Applicants: Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility: NONCOMPETITIVE NOTICE OF INTENT TO AWARD
Agency Code: DOI-NPS
Agency Name: Department of the Interior
National Park Service
Posted Date: Apr 18, 2017
Close Date: Apr 28, 2017
Last Updated Date: Apr 18, 2017
Award Ceiling: $1
Award Floor: $1
Estimated Total Program Funding: $125,357
Expected Number of Awards: 1
Description: The Native Fish Conservation Plan (Koel et al. 2010) proposed a framework for conserving native fish in Yellowstone National Park from 2011-2031. An important component of the Native Fish Conservation Plan is to focus on the restoration of westslope cutthroat trout and arctic grayling populations in streams, rivers, and lakes in the Madison and Gallatin river drainages in the park. All fish populations in these watersheds are evaluated in an adaptive management framework (table 6; fig. 6 of the Native Fish Conservation Plan) that specifies conservation actions, defines success in terms of quantitative responses and performance metrics, and identifies alternatives to be considered if conservation actions do not produce a desired result. Desired conditions are for specific waters (project areas) within the Madison and Gallatin river drainages. The cumulative result of multiple projects for westslope cutthroat trout and arctic grayling would be designed to meet the Native Fish Conservation Plan measureable objectives. Objectives defined are to restore westslope cutthroat trout and arctic grayling until they each occupy at least 200 km (124 mi.) of stream habitat in Yellowstone National Park (Koel et al. 2017). The NPS and partners intend to work within a few project areas each year, with the cumulative results of multiple restoration projects meeting these objectives within 20 years.
Version: Synopsis 1





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