Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research on Disparities in Surgical Care and Outcomes (R21)

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Opportunity ID: 284877
Opportunity Number: NOT-MD-16-006
Opportunity Title: Notice of Intent to Publish a Funding Opportunity Announcement for Research on Disparities in Surgical Care and Outcomes (R21)
Opportunity Category: Discretionary
Opportunity Category Explanation:
Funding Instrument Type: Grant
Category of Funding Activity: Health
Category Explanation:
CFDA Number(s): 93.307
Eligible Applicants: State governments
County governments
City or township governments
Independent school districts
Public and State controlled institutions of higher education
Native American tribal governments (Federally recognized)
Public housing authorities/Indian housing authorities
Native American tribal organizations (other than Federally recognized tribal governments)
Nonprofits having a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Nonprofits that do not have a 501(c)(3) status with the IRS, other than institutions of higher education
Private institutions of higher education
For profit organizations other than small businesses
Small businesses
Others (see text field entitled “Additional Information on Eligibility” for clarification)
Additional Information on Eligibility:
Agency Code: HHS-NIH11
Agency Name: Department of Health and Human Services
National Institutes of Health
Posted Date: Jun 06, 2016
Last Updated Date: Jun 06, 2016
Estimated Synopsis Post Date: May 09, 2016
Fiscal Year: 2017
Award Ceiling: $200,000
Award Floor:
Estimated Total Program Funding: $900,000
Expected Number of Awards: 3
Description: ?The National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities, intends promote a new initiative by publishing a Funding Opportunity Announcement (FOA) to solicit applications for exploratory and developmental research on surgical disparities in care and outcomes. Although breakthrough surgical methods, technologies and instrumentation have advanced the field, the delivery of safe, and quality surgical care and outcomes have not benefited all patient groups. Access to clinically-indicated surgical care and optimal outcomes is affected by a number of factors including socioeconomic status, age, sex/gender, level of education, race, ethnicity, health care availability, and region. While insurance status or co-morbidity might be thought of as the most reliable surrogate for prediction of surgical outcome differences, the delay of surgery, referral patterns, facility or provider volume and resources and unconscious biases are but a few additional mechanisms that can lead to disparities in care delivery, management and optimal outcomes across the continuum.
Version: Forecast 1

Source:: http://www.grants.gov/web/grants/view-opportunity.html?oppId=284877

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